Tag Archive for 'small business day'

An official day for small business owners

Labor Day began as an idea in the mind of a 19th century labor leader — some say Matthew Maguire, others say Peter McGuire — who cared greatly for a very important segment of the marketplace, its workers.

Regardless of paternity, such a day was first celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, when members of the CLU took an unpaid day off to demonstrate solidarity and, of course, have picnics. And ever since 1884, when President Grover Cleveland’s signature designated the first Monday in September as Labor Day, it’s been an official federal holiday.

In 1898, Samuel Gompers, then head of the American Federation of Labor, called Labor Day, “the day for which the toilers in past centuries looked forward, when their rights and their wrongs would be discussed … that the workers of our day may not only lay down their tools of labor for a holiday, but upon which they may touch shoulders in marching phalanx and feel the stronger for it.”

Alas, entrepreneurs aren’t organized like our union brethren — probably because we’re too busy making payroll. There is no single Small Business Day officially decreed by the U.S. Government. No Entrepreneur’s Day set aside to honor the few who do so much for so many; a day to picnic and party down in honor of the real heroes of the marketplace, small business owners.

There actually is a small business week when the U.S. Small Business Administration recognizes the “creme de la creme” of entrepreneurs in America. But it’s not an official “Day” and it’s not always the same week each year.

Small businesses represent over 98% of all U.S. businesses and produce over half of the U.S. $17 trillion GDP.  Plus, we sign the FRONT of the paychecks of over half (70 million) of all U.S. workers.

Let’s see: Big deal on Labor Day — no Small Business Day. What’s wrong with this picture?

So, what’s the answer? Let’s celebrate Small Business Day in a way no other national holiday has been established: on a Sunday — actually, the second Sunday in August.

Sunday is preferred because that would create the least payroll expense. August is the month-of-choice because that’s when politicians are home on recess. This way they can practice casting their pearls before we small business owners in preparation for eating barbeque and sucking up to unions on Labor Day.

To paraphrase Samuel Gompers, small business owners deserve a day for which these signers-of-the-front-of-paychecks can look forward to when their rights and wrongs would be discussed; that the small employers of our day may not only lay down their challenges for a holiday, but during which they may touch shoulders in marching phalanx and feel the stronger for it.

Write this on a rock … Entrepreneurs unite!  It’s time we had a day to honor small business owners.

An official day for small business owners

Labor Day began as an idea in the mind of a 19th century labor leader — some say Matthew Maguire, others say Peter McGuire — who cared greatly for a very important segment of the marketplace, its workers.

Regardless of paternity, such a day was first celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, when members of the CLU took an unpaid day off to demonstrate solidarity and, of course, have picnics. And ever since 1984, when President Grover Cleveland’s signature designated the first Monday in September as Labor Day, it’s been an official federal holiday.

In 1898, Samuel Gompers, then head of the American Federation of Labor, called Labor Day, “the day for which the toilers in past centuries looked forward, when their rights and their wrongs would be discussed … that the workers of our day may not only lay down their tools of labor for a holiday, but upon which they may touch shoulders in marching phalanx and feel the stronger for it.”

Alas, entrepreneurs aren’t organized like our union brethren — probably because we’re too busy making payroll. There is no single Small Business Day officially decreed by the U.S. Government. No Entrepreneur’s Day set aside to honor the few who do so much for so many; a day to picnic and party down in honor of the real heroes of the marketplace, small business owners.

There actually is a small business week when the U.S. Small Business Administration recognizes the “creme de la creme” of entrepreneurs in America. But it’s not an official “Day” and it’s not always the same week each year.

Small businesses represent over 98% of all U.S. businesses and produce over half of the U.S. $17 trillion GDP.  Plus, we sign the FRONT of the paychecks of over half (70 million) of all U.S. workers.

Let’s see: Big deal on Labor Day — no Small Business Day. What’s wrong with this picture?

So, what’s the answer? Let’s celebrate Small Business Day in a way no other national holiday has been established: on a Sunday — actually, the second Sunday in August.

Sunday is preferred because that would create the least payroll expense. August is the month-of-choice because that’s when politicians are home on recess. This way they can practice casting their pearls before we small business owners in preparation for eating barbeque and sucking up to unions on Labor Day.

To paraphrase Samuel Gompers, small business owners deserve a day for which these signers-of-the-front-of-paychecks can look forward to when their rights and wrongs would be discussed; that the small employers of our day may not only lay down their challenges for a holiday, but during which they may touch shoulders in marching phalanx and feel the stronger for it.

Write this on a rock … Entrepreneurs unite!  It’s time we had a day to honor small business owners.

A day in the life of a small business owner

Eep … Eep … Eep … Eep …

5:15am: A small business owner hits the snooze button.
“Man, I shoulda checked the buzzer out before I bought that clock. Big day – should hear about my loan and the ACME proposal. What if the bank turns me down? Chamber board meeting at 7:30 this morning. Susie’s game is 7:30 tonight.”

7:15am: At the office.
“Good; Bill’s on time. Gotta get the Johnson delivery before it rains – that check has to cover quarterly taxes. Customer at the door and he saw me – can’t make him wait. There goes the Chamber meeting. ‘Come in, sir.’”

8:15am: In the warehouse.
“Why does Bill have the hood up on the truck? Is that smoke from the motor? Whew! It’s his cigarette – he’s just checking the oil. Darn, overhead door stuck again?”

10:15am: On the counter.
“Got to get the light fixed on the sign – don’t notice it so much unless it’s … CLOUDY.”

12:15am: At the post office.
“Lots of bills – no checks. Payroll’s going to be close Friday – hope I get paid. Got to get help with accounts receivable. Come on bank loan! Not a certified letter! I hate those.”

1:15pm: Returning calls.
“ACME called – that’s probably good. Bill called from Johnson’s – that’s probably bad. Loan officer’s on two – that could go either way. Is that rain?”

2:15pm: At the bank
“The bank needs updated financials – no loan this week. Forgot to eat lunch again.”

3:15pm: Back at the office.
“ACME’s on three? Now I REALLY need that deal. May have to cut into my margin – don’t give it away. You’re not desperate – yet.”

4:15pm: Watching it rain.
“Johnson didn’t get delivered before the rain. No Johnson check or loan this week. What’s Plan B for the tax deposit? Maybe receivables will pick up. Better put Larry on the counter so I can focus on collections.”

5:15pm: Closing time.
“Good day on the counter. ACME went for my proposal but had to cut my price. Hope we get add-ons. Turn off the sign. NOW the rain stops.”

6:15pm: Locking up.
“What a roller coaster today! Would I have started this business if I’d known how hard it was going to be? It’s challenging, but I like owning the opportunities. Still, I look forward to not having to struggle – does that ever happen in a small business? Susie’s 7:30 game isn’t rained out. I’m hungry.”

5:15am: Next morning.
Eep … Eep … Eep … Eep …

“Man, I really wish I had checked the buzzer out before I bought that clock.”

Welcome to the world of small business ownership.

Check out more great SBA content HERE!




Warning: fsockopen() [function.fsockopen]: php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Temporary failure in name resolution in /var/www/wordpress/wp-includes/class-snoopy.php on line 1142

Warning: fsockopen() [function.fsockopen]: unable to connect to twitter.com:80 (Unknown error) in /var/www/wordpress/wp-includes/class-snoopy.php on line 1142