Tag Archive for 'investment capital'

Investor search mistakes to avoid, part 2

Last week I introduced you to a list of mistakes businesses make when searching for investment capital. The list came from a book by my friend, Andrew Sherman, titled, Raising Capital. As we learned, there’s more to acquiring capital than a business plan.

So now let’s take a look at the rest of Andrew’s list, and, like last time, each one is followed by my thoughts.

Mistake: Not understanding the investor selection process.
Don’t deliver information with a fire hose when a pitcher is preferred. If there is interest, investors will request the full details as needed.

You’ll need three documents: an initial, one-to-three-page executive summary (the pitcher), an intermediate 10-page (+-) model, and a long one with all numbers and research (fire hose). Deliver the last two only when requested.

Mistake: Too little research and analysis.
You must have market/industry research and analysis to back up your assumptions and projections. Investors don’t value promises or hunches. Don’t show extensive data until requested, but reference and summarize what you’ve learned in the short models.

Mistake: Underestimating the funding chronology.
If your funding requirements and the investor’s investment schedule are not in sync, guess who makes adjustments? Remember, to an investor, urgency sounds like desperation. And this will be true for crowdfunding as well.

Mistake: Being afraid to share your idea.
Sherman says you can’t sell if you can’t tell. Get a non-disclosure agreement that fits your project and use it. Investors not only expect to sign an NDA, they won’t respect you if you don’t give them one.

Mistake: Being dollar-wise and investor foolish.
Trick question: Which is the best alternative: a) $1 million from investors who know nothing about your industry; or b) $500,000 from investors who have industry background and contacts? Since the value of an investor relationship is usually more than cash, “b” is often the correct choice. Consider all forms of investor participation when evaluating an offer.

Mistake: Getting hung up on initial ownership and control.
Establishing ownership and control is where most investment negotiations break down. Here’s a handy rule: He who has the gold makes the rules, which usually includes control. Business founders are typically better served focusing more on the investor exit plan and less on initial control.

Accomplishing a successful investor relationship requires thoughtful preparation plus skillful negotiation.

Write this on a rock … Know the rules before pursuing an investor search.

Three fundamentals of small business capitalization

The first sentence in the job description of every CEO should be, “Get the capital your company needs.”

Webster defines business capital as, “any asset, tangible or intangible, that is held for long-term investment.” Capital blended with operating cash flows becomes the financial fuel your company’s engine uses to operate with and fund growth.

•  Investment Capital — from you or someone else.

•  Borrowed Funds — for most small businesses, from a bank loan.

Additional capital is required just to STAY in business beyond what was necessary to START the business. And the stay-in-business capital is much more than the get-in-business capital. Success begets growth and growth eats capital like Cookie Monster eats chocolate chip cookies. So without a capitalization plan you can grow yourself out of business.

Here are three capital allocation guidelines.

1. Don’t use operating cash to purchase assets.

2. Don’t borrow money for operating expenses.

3. Funding growth with borrowed money is okay, if you have a plan to convert growth funding from debt to retained earnings.

Retained Earnings

As the CEO or your business, it’s your job to acquire, manage, allocate and maximize all sources of capital.


Jim Blasingame is the author of the new book,”The Age of the Customer: Prepare for the Moment of Relevance.

Three fundamentals of small business capitalization

The first sentence in the job description of every CEO should be, “Get the capital your company needs.”

Webster defines business capital as, “any asset, tangible or intangible, that is held for long-term investment.” Capital blended with operating cash flows becomes the financial fuel your company’s engine uses to operate with and fund growth.

•  Investment Capital — from you or someone else.

•  Borrowed Funds — for most small businesses, from a bank loan.

Additional capital is required just to STAY in business beyond what was necessary to START the business. And the stay-in-business capital is much more than the get-in-business capital. Success begets growth and growth eats capital like Cookie Monster eats chocolate chip cookies. So without a capitalization plan you can grow yourself out of business.

Here are three capital allocation guidelines. Don’t use operating cash to purchase assets. Don’t borrow money for operating expenses. Funding growth with borrowed money is okay, if you have a plan to convert growth funding from debt to retained earnings.

Retained Earnings

As the CEO or your business, it’s your job to acquire, manage, allocate and maximize all sources of capital.


Jim Blasingame is the author of the new book,”The Age of the Customer: Prepare for the Moment of Relevance.

Angel investors and other small business capital sources

Blasingame’s 3rd Law of Small Business states, “Its redundant to say ‘undercapitalized small business.’”

There are two primary reasons this Law is true:

1. Unlike big businesses, small businesses typically have only three sources of capital: a) retained earnings (profits left in the business); b) direct investment, usually by the founder; and c) debt, usually from a bank.

2. Everyday one or more elements of a small business are screaming for funds to increase the company’s competitive advantage.

Even very successful small businesses are undercapitalized. In fact, ironically, the more successful a small business is, the more undercapitalized it will likely be. If a business is not growing, it needs capital to achieve growth. A growing business needs capital for R&D, upgrading technology, acquiring new product lines, funding accounts receivable and inventory that increase with sales growth – the list is long.

For most small businesses, the lion’s share of capital comes from retained earnings and bank debt. However, other than the founder’s investment, direct equity capital is less likely. But when outside equity is acquired, the next most likely source is from angel investors, which has become an increasing direct investment option over the past few years.

An angel investor is typically an individual who has money to invest and, instead of putting all of it in the stock market, he or she will allocate a portion to invest directly into a business, which could be either a start-up or a going concern. More recently, angel investors have formed regional consortiums to aggregate their investment dollars in order to spread the risk and make sure that they don’t make the mistake of under-funding a venture.

Most people have heard of venture capitalists (VC), the big dogs of entrepreneurial investment. Angels are sort of mini-VCs. The big difference is the level of funding and, in many cases, the closeness of the relationship with management; angels will be more likely to be geographically and emotionally closer to their recipient than a VC. The big similarity is that both anticipate an exit strategy where their capital – and hopefully a profit – are returned. This last point is the primary reason why most small businesses are not candidates for any investor capital, since the typical small business founder expects to run his or her business forever and perhaps hand it off to the next generation.

Recently, on my small business radio program, The Small Business Advocate Show, I talked about how angel investors choose investment candidates with Tim Berry. Tim is the world’s leading expert on business planning, founder of Palo Alto Software, an original member of my Brain Trust and my good friend. Tim is not only an angel investor, he is a member of one of those angel consortiums mentioned earlier. Take a few minutes to listen to what Tim told me about his experience and this fascinating process.




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