Tag Archive for 'finances'

11 financial fundamentals every small business CEO must know

Regardless of the size of the business, ultimate responsibility for success lies with the CEO. If you’re a small business owner, that’s you. And the most critical CEO tasks that result in success or failure lie in the knowledge and practice of financial management fundamentals.

Statistics show that over half of small businesses fail within the first four years. Clearly that mortality could be significantly reduced if, before a business opened, the founder/CEO was required to pass a course that teaches business financial fundamentals and how to operate a business with them.

If you could use a little help in this area, allow me to identify some of the key elements that would be part of the curriculum of such a course.

-  CEOs shouldn’t do their own accounting, but successful ones learn how to manage with regular (at least quarterly) financial statements (balance sheet and profit-and-loss) that an internal and/or external accountant produced.

-  Successful CEOs know what their gross profit margin needs to be and what it is.

-  Smart CEOs track monthly sales-to-expense ratios in order to know when to adjust spending.

-  Savvy CEOs monitor inventory levels against projected sales, receivables and cash.

-  Real CEOs know how to calculate Accounts Receivable days and Accounts Payable days, understand the relationship between the two, and the impact of that relationship on cash.

-  Disciplined CEOs develop a capitalization strategy that blends retained earnings with short and long-term capital sources, like bank debt.

-  Capable CEOs identify the critical financial indicators and ratios that are revealed on the balance sheet and its relationship with the profit-and-loss statement.

-  Surviving CEOs believe and prepare for the cruel irony of how sales growth becomes dangerous when not properly funded, indeed, that you can succeed yourself out of business.

-  When a business isn’t profitable, professional CEOs identify the top impediments to profitability and deal with them quickly, decisively, and without emotion.

-  Perennially successful CEOs delegate many things well, but they stay close to the company’s cash picture from tomorrow to the next 12 months.

And finally, arguably the most important financial management CEO discipline:

-  Understand and monitor the relationship between Blasingame’s Three Clocks of Small Business: The Expense Clock, the Sales Clock and the Cash Clock.

If you already own a small business and cold sweat is popping out on your forehead right now that should motivate you to kick your financial education into high gear and become an expert on these fundamentals.

If you haven’t started your business yet, don’t until you can pass this course.

Write this on a rock … The ultimate responsibility for your business’s financial performance belongs to the CEO - that’s you.

To listen to Jim talk more about the 11 financial fundamentals for CEOs, click on one of the links below:

6 financial fundamentals every small business owner must know

5 of the 11 most important small business financial fundamentals

Small Business Advocate Poll: National Bank, Independent Bank, or Credit Union?

The Question:
With which of these three do you have your primary business banking relationship?

60% - National or large regional bank

36% - Independent community bank

4% - Credit union

My Comments:
In our most recent online poll, over 60% of respondents to our most recent poll chose “National or large regional bank” as the financial organization they have their primary relationship with. A little more than a third chose, “Independent community bank,” and only 5% said “Credit union.”

As you may know, for most of two decades, I’ve advised small business owners that not only should one of their banking relationships be with an independent community bank, it should be their primary bank - the one that has your deposit account and is your go-to bank for a business loan.

Blasingame’s 2nd Law of Small Business states: It’s redundant to say “undercapitalized small business.” This truth is why small businesses need a bank relationship that’s heavy on the relationship part; with a bank that has one of its founding principles to serve small businesses in the community, including making local loan decisions by humans, not computers.

I never said there was anything wrong with the big banks. In fact, I have recommended that small businesses should have a second relationship with a larger bank. One good reason is because if your business grows to a point where you have multi-millions in annual revenue, you could outgrow your beloved community bank and that’s when only a large regional or national bank will do.

But my advice to maintain a relationship with a locally-owned and governed community bank turned to prophecy when, in 2008, the national chain banks and the large regionals got caught up in the financial crisis and they basically abandoned small businesses. They didn’t do this to be mean; they did it to survive.

Big banks are trying really hard to recover the ground they’ve lost in the past three years, so perhaps their plan is working. Also, loan demand by small businesses is still very low, so the computer-generated, credit-scoring method of loan evaluation practiced by the big banks is not yet putting pressure on these relationships.

Nevertheless, I still believe that, regardless of any other banking relationship, a small business should have an active relationship with an independent community bank - if for no other reason than long-term survival.

Recently on The Small Business Advocate Show I talked with my friend and Brain Trust member, Mike Menzies, President of Easton Bank & Trust in Easton, Maryland about the independent community bank landscape and how independent banks are faring in this economy. Click on one of the links below to listen or download.

The economy, small businesses and independent banks

The independent community bank landscape

Check out more great SBA content HERE!

Take this week’s poll HERE!




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