Tag Archive for 'employee recognition'

On top of a fence post

A while back I heard someone accept an award by telling this story. He said, “I once saw a turtle on top of a fence post. The first thing that struck me was that the turtle surely had not gotten there by himself.”

The gentleman went on to accept the award on behalf of all those who had helped him get to the top of his “fence post”.

If you are the owner, employer, and/or manager of a team of people, next time you find yourself “on top of a fence post”, make sure that you recognize the others who helped you to reach your lofty perch.

Not only is it the right thing to do, but remember, Newton’s law of gravity is especially active around fence posts. It’s handy to have people around who will want to break your fall in case you find yourself experiencing Mr. Newton’s law in an untimely descent from on high.


In the Age of the Customer, employee engagement is paramount

As we enter what I am calling the “Age of the Customer,” employee engagement becomes more and more essential for small business success.  If you want customers to stay engaged with your business you have to have engaged employees for them to interact with. If you’re not meeting your business goals, there is an excellent chance that you have an employee engagement problem.  Chester Elton is one of the world’s leading experts on employee engagement and he says your people have to have a reason to value their work other than the pay.

Today Chester joined me on my radio program, The Small Business Advocate Show, to discussed why employee engagement is needed now more than ever, and reported on some real examples of how two businesses increased their bottom lines by increasing employee engagement.

Besides being a valuable member of my Brain Trust, Chester Elton is a world-travelled speaker and recognition consultant and co-author of several books on employee recognition, including The Carrot Principle.  His day-job is as the “apostle of appreciation” at the O.C. Tanner Company. Take a few minutes to listen to our visit and leave your thoughts on what you’ve done to motivate your internal customers. Listen Live! Download, Too!

Small business and the value of employee recognition

A while back I heard someone accept an award by telling this story. He said, “I once saw a turtle on top of a fence post. The first thing that struck me was that the turtle surely had not gotten there by himself.”

The gentleman went on to accept the award on behalf of all those who had helped him get to the top of his “fence post”.

If you are the owner, employer, and/or manager of a team of people, next time you find yourself “on top of a fencepost”, make sure that you recognize the others who helped you to reach your lofty perch.

Not only is it the right thing to do, but remember, Newton’s law of gravity is especially active around fence posts. It’s handy to have people around who will want to break your fall in case you find yourself experiencing Mr. Newton’s law in an untimely descent from on high.

But don’t wait for your next Academy Award or Grammy moment to recognize your people. Do it now. Today. This week.

For decades, research conducted on exit interviews to determine why people leave a company has invariably shown that the number one reason employees leave a company on their own is because they felt that the company and/or their manager did not appreciate them. Not money - lack of recognition.

So here are two questions for you: How much would it cost your business if a key employee resigned? How much would a regular practice - or program - of employee recognition cost?

Knowing about this research, and the answer to these questions, is why I’ve made it a point over the years to interview top employee recognition experts to talk about this on my small business radio program, The Small Business Advocate Show. No one fits this profile better than my Brain Trust member, Chester Elton, co-author of The Carrot Principle (carrots.com).

Recently, Chester joined me to talk about the fact that employee recognition is not only a critical best practice; but, as I mentioned earlier, it’s also the right thing to do. Take a few minutes to listen to what this expert has to say. And don’t forget to leave your thoughts on this topic.




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