Tag Archive for 'Democrats'

RESULTS:Have the midterms impacted your attitude about the 2015 economy?

The Question:

Photo credit to DonkeyHotey on Flickr.comHow have the results of the midterm election impacted your attitude about the economy in 2015?

18% - I’m optimistic about next year but not because of politics
44% - I’m more optimistic about 2015 because the GOP control Congress
0% - I’m less optimistic because the Democrats lost control of Congress
38% - I’m pessimistic about the economy because of all the politicians
Jim’s Comments:
As you can see, over half of our respondents are either indifferent toward, or negative about the impact of the Political Class on their business.  The rest are hopeful about their business because of the upcoming Republican-controlled Congress. Alas, the Dems got no love in this poll.
I’m going to have more to say about these results in a longer piece in the next week or so. Stay tuned. Thanks for participating and be sure to take our new poll this week.

**Photo credit to Donkey Hotey on Flickr.com. Image links to page. (CC).

Small Business Advocate Poll: Who will you elect to be the next president?

The Question:
In about six months either Barack Obama or Mitt Romney will be elected as the next president.
At this moment, who will you vote for?

12% - Barack Obama

83% - Mitt Romney

5% - Neither

My Commentary:
The Republican primary process is practically, if not technically over, and all signs point to a contest this November 6 between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. Every day, one or more national polls are being released showing how these two are doing against each other either in general, or with regard to one group or another, such as independents, for example.

We wanted to know how Obama and Romney were doing with the small business electorate, so last week we asked this question of our audience: “In about six months either Barack Obama or Mitt Romney will be elected as the next president. At this moment, who will you vote for?”

As you can see, if our poll is any indication regarding small business politics, President Obama has some work to do with those who create over half of America’s GDP, employ over half of all workers and create most of the new jobs. Can he close the gap?

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I have talked to several experts on my radio program, The Small Business Advocate Show, about the 2012 election, why it’s so important, and the prospects of the two parties. Click here to see the list and download or listen.

Check out more great SBA content HERE!

Take this week’s poll HERE!

Small business lessons for Washington

There are innumerable issues and circumstances that can create obstacles to small business success. Whether internal or external, most of these factors occur naturally in the course of doing business, and dealing with them just comes with the territory.

But there is one issue that small business owners shouldn’t be threatened with: poor performance of Washington’s political class.

The marketplace is indifferent to, and unforgiving of, the poor performance of any small business. But what is the small business appeal process when government behavior compromises the greater economy?

Job-one for small business owners is to keep their financial affairs in order – cash flow, profitability, etc. Failure to do so negates positive performance of all other activity.
Job-one for members of Congress is to appropriate the funds for the short and long-term financial operation of the government. Since the federal fiscal year begins on October 1, it follows that the budget and associated appropriations should be completed by September 30. At least that’s how things work in a small business – in the real world.

Without any sense of shame, it apparently seems normal to the Washington political class to still be debating the 2011 budget and funding process with less than half of the fiscal year remaining. Without any sense of embarrassment, the political class continues to behave in such a way as to be regularly compared to a Kabuki dance.

Kabuki is a form of Japanese theater in which characters dress, dance and behave on stage in ways that require the audience to suspend any sense of reality to enjoy. Sadly, few metaphors are more apt today.

We wanted to know what my radio, Internet and Newsletter audience thought about the behavior of America’s Kabuki cast of characters, so we asked this question: “Who is to blame for how Washington is handling the 2011 budget process?”

Even though both major political parties were offered up as the first two options, the response to the third is at once dramatic and hopeful. Almost 60% of our sample chose: “A pox on both houses; both are incompetent.”

If this super-majority sentiment is representative and endures to November 2012, all candidates may be required to demonstrate that they will operate the government as a successful small business owner does – in the responsible, real world.

Perhaps it would be enough just to have a sense of shame.

Last week on my radio program, The Small Business Advocate Show, I talked more about the lack of statesmanship and political shenanigans going on these days in Washington, D.C. Take a few minutes to click on the links below and leave us your thoughts on how you think the political haranguing should be resolved.

Washington’s Kabuki Dance: Without any sense of shame

America’s canary in the mineshaft

Dangers of changing the health care reform pronouns

In his 1973 book, “Winning Through Intimidation,” Robert Ringer wrote that when he was negotiating with another party who brought an attorney along, the attorney would typically begin by saying, “He (the client) wants …” this or that. Later, Ringer said, the attorney would change the pronoun to, “We want …” When the attorney’s pronoun inevitably changed to “I want … ,” Ringer said he would get up and walk about of the room because he knew the negotiation focus had shifted from the deal to the ego of the attorney.

Alas, there has been a pronoun shift in the health care reform debate that should be pointed out.

“He (Americans) wants …”
In the beginning, most people on both sides of the debate agreed that something should be done to improve the way we deliver and pay for health care. Initially, the debate was over how to accomplish that Herculean task, and it sounded like, “He wants …”

“We want …”
Even though Democrats control the Legislative and Executive Branches, there is a heated debate within the party about health care reform. So when you blend this internal debate with the political prudence of passing legislation that includes Republican votes, then stir in the arbitrary time pressure President Obama and the Democrat leadership have placed on this process, the result is a political contest with so many different players and rules that the average person watching can’t possibly score this game at home. This is where the debate sounds like the attorney is saying, “We want …”

“I want …”
In all of this convolution, there is one thing that is becoming clear to regular folks: Those in the “damn the political torpedoes, full speed ahead” camp are looking like their objective has evolved from health care reform for its own sake to health care reform purely for the sake of politics, as in, “I want …”

No one is naive enough to believe that any health care reform won’t be political, but when we’re talking about a topic that involves 17% of the U.S. economy and has few peers in terms of the personal impact on every American, shouldn’t we expect the final reform product to actually be focused more on lasting solutions than on accomplishing a political victory?

Watching this embarrassing mayhem has led me to want no health care reform legislation at all right now. Any bill produced in the current process will be flawed policy that will surely create more harm than good. The reform process should be scrapped completely until the debate addresses societal and market realities of the 21st century, rather than be the victim of political dysfunction.

It’s time for Americans to tell Congressional delegates to walk away from this negotiation until the correct pronouns are being used.

Recently, on my small business radio program, The Small Business Advocate Show, I talked about the problems with the current state of health care reform. Also on my show this week, I discussed health care reform with Grace-Marie Turner, President of the Galen Institute. Take a few minutes to listen to these thoughts on this important topic and, as always, be sure to leave your thoughts.




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