Tag Archive for 'brainstorming'

Blasingame’s Three Laws of Aggregation (or Two reasons your small business is like Sakrete)

Sakrete is one of the handiest products ever developed. It’s basically a bag of rocks and sand, but to a weekend warrior with a honey-do list, it can be a magic dust.

Packaged in small bags almost anyone can carry, Sakrete is an aggregation of Portland cement, sand and different size gravel. Just stir in water, apply it to your small construction project, wait a little while and, badabing badaboom, you’ve got real concrete supporting your project.

So, what does a small business have to do with a sack of rocks? Two things.

1. Chemistry.

When the components of Sakrete come in contact with water, a productive reaction occurs that, in a short time, manifests as a handy and enduring result. In the marketplace, productive chemistry between people and organizations is has long been known to be critical for sustaining successful performance. Whether Sakrete or your small business, the right chemistry is critical.

2. Aggregation.

Sakrete doesn’t just aggregate the correct combination of stuff, but also different sizes of masonry material. The larger pieces provide critical mass and structure, while the smaller ones bind everything together and nimbly fill in the gaps to eliminate weak spots. But unlike chemistry, aggregation is not as much of a natural law and requires more maintenance. Which is why there are no Blasingame Laws of Chemistry, but three Blasingame Laws of Aggregation.

Blasingame’s 1st Law of Aggregation

Find your success in aggregating the success of employees.

Simply put, this is servant leadership, a term Robert Greenleaf coined in his book titled, you guessed it: Servant Leadership. But the concept goes back thousands of years to the ancient Chinese wisdom of I Ching, “The highest type of ruler is one of whose existence the people are barely aware.” And in his gospel, Mark quotes Jesus, “Whoever wants to be great among you must be your servant.”

Leaders who sustain success, year after year, are those who subordinate their ego by helping their people to be successful professionals, and then aggregate those success stories for the benefit of the company. They celebrate others first.

Blasingame’s 2nd Law of Aggregation

Aggregation prevents aggravation.

In business, aggregation is also known as strategic alliances, which small businesses must build with other organizations, especially larger ones.

It’s aggravating at least, and dangerous at worst, to manage threats and take advantage of opportunities without strategic resources. Compare the merits of forming a strategic alliance with an organization that already has what you need before you risk the expense and possible delay of capitalizing the ownership of that resource. And if you prefer, you can call it strategic aggregation.

Blasingame’s 3rd Law of Aggregation

Associate your brands with those that are more established.

I also call this the “Forrest Gump Strategy.” As you develop strategic alliances, look for partners with brands and influence that have a higher recognition factor than yours, and arrange for the relationship to include your brand being presented in the marketplace alongside theirs. Brand association is smart aggregation, but you have to step up your game to earn the right to that level of aggregation.

Write this on a rock … If you’re not having the level of success you want, perhaps you should take some lessons from Sakrete.

The power of brainstorming with adjectives

How dull would our world be without adjectives? You know, those handy words or terms we use, as Webster says, to “modify a noun.” Indeed, without the descriptive power of an adjective, a noun is nothing more than a bland commodity – like broccoli without hollandaise.

If I offered you a soybean, you would probably be less than intrigued. But what if I said it was a “beautiful soybean”? You’d want to see such a bean, wouldn’t you? A change of attitude, all because of the power of an adjective.

Adjectives can be powerful and useful in your business when they help you take a look at your company, products, services, etc., in an honest, creative, competitive and critical way. One method of pursuing the power of adjectives is through brainstorming.

My friend and Brain Trust member, Floyd Hurt, author of Rousing Creativity, says brainstorming is a great way to get organizational creative juices flowing. And creativity is the mother’s milk of powerful adjectives. Everybody knows that! So get your team together (if you’re a one-person shop, your support group) and conduct a brainstorming session. But first, it’s important to know the Floyd Hurt rules of brainstorming below, followed by my comments.

Free wheeling
There should be virtually no restrictions. Floyd says if you’re pursuing how to pep up the showroom and someone says “Let’s put an elephant in there,” the next comment should be, “Are we talking African or Indian?” And don’t worry that your idea isn’t complete. Even partial ideas can spark the other half from someone else.

No criticism
Some adjectives may not be positive, especially when you’re working on constant improvement. Everyone must feel that what they say will not be criticized, and that all brainstorming contributions will be considered constructive.

Combine and improve
This is where you put some of your brainstorming ideas, including the half-baked ones mentioned above, together to make a better idea. After this kind of synergy clicks the first time with your group, buckle up, because your brainstorming will probably blast off with new energy.

Judgment of ideas
Which one of the ideas will you work on first? This is the culling process. Everything idea is not a keeper – at least not today. But don’t throw anything away. Keep the unused ideas and adjectives for the next session. Ideas are like seeds: sometimes they need time to germinate.

Quantity
This is where the power of adjectives really comes into play. A brainstorming session MUST have LOTS of ideas complete with powerful adjectives. Write them ALL down! EVERY ONE!!

The immortal Adam Smith identified the written word as one of the three greatest human inventions. Besides the brainstorming power you’ll generate, never underestimate the power of having your ideas on paper, looking back at you.

Write this on a rock … Use brainstorming to unleash the power of adjectives.

Small business and the heretics among us

Have you ever had someone – like an employee – say something to you that, at the time, sounded so off-the-wall that you dismissed the comment and mentally put the person in the “wacko” category? But then, after a while – a few days, weeks or months – things happened that made what that person said actually start to look more like wisdom than wacko?

If the scenario above has happened to you, turns out, you were in the company of a heretic. Isn’t it interesting how often today’s heretic becomes tomorrow’s prophet?

According to my Brain Trust member, Art Kleiner, who wrote the book on this topic, “The Age of Heretics,” a heretic is someone who is a true believer in what you’re doing, has discovered something they feel should be noted even if the news isn’t welcomed, and who has the courage of his or her convictions to speak truth to power. Every small business owner or manager should pray that they not only have heretics working for them, including the courage thing, but, more importantly, that they – the power – are smart enough to listen to and seriously consider what could be prophecy.

Recently I talked with Art Kleiner about this topic on my small business radio program, The Small Business Advocate Show. If you agree with my “prayer” idea above, and if you listen to my conversation with Art, I think you’ll actually be able to benefit from your next close encounter of the heretical kind and, perhaps, even begin fostering some heretical thinking in your organization.




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