Archive for the 'Technology' Category

Mobile computing will dominate your future — are you ready for it?

Remember all the years I’ve said every small business MUST have a website? It’s still true, except now that’s not enough. Today you also have to be ready for the mobile customer.

Once only wizards and fairies had magic wands. But in The Age of the Customer, hundreds of millions of Earthlings now have one in the palm of their hands. Here are the U.S. numbers:

According to Statista, this year over 180 million Americans will own a smartphone, and that number will grow by 10% to almost 200 million in 2016. That’s just about every American between the ages of 16 and 80. Here’s another way to say that: Essentially all of your prospects and customers.

In a recent online poll we took of our audience, slightly more than half either had a mobile site or were acquiring one. Good for them. But that means almost half didn’t and had no plans.

technology-512210_1280Tough love alert: If your business isn’t ready for mobile primetime, it’s a dinosaur waiting to become extinct. Any questions? But there’s good news: You can avoid death-by-mobile in less than a month. Stay with me.

Where we once converted our analog lives to the online digital world with a personal computer, the shift is now to the small screen of the smartphone. And we’re integrating these new light sabers into our lives and businesses even more than the PC including, but by all means not limited to:

  • Download and use productive and fun apps
  • Read newspapers - even books
  • Navigate on foot and wheels
  • Record and share our lives with photos and video
  • Connect to others on social media
  • Shop for, buy and pay for stuff

You can get ready for mobile customers with these two steps:

1.  Hire someone to help you get your online information optimized for local search. This is important for a comprehensive online strategy, but mandatory for mobile primetime. Mobile users are often literally trying to find your business.

2.  Hire someone to build a mobile site (might not be the same person as #1). When your URL is requested from a smartphone, the mobile site presents automatically with your regular website offerings netted out and with fewer graphics for the smaller screen - form follows function. Mobile sites cost less than mobile apps to create, update and maintain, and a mobile site icon looks just like a mobile app. Most small businesses don’t need a mobile app.

Here’s that good news I promised: You can complete these two tasks in a month. How much will it cost? Not as much as you think, but that’s not the question. How much will it cost if you don’t get ready for mobile primetime?

Write this on a rock … Mobile computing wasn’t any part of your past, but it will dominate your future.

Jim Blasingame is the author of the award-winning book, “The Age of the Customer: Prepare for the Moment of Relevance.”

It’s time to adapt to the new age of technology

Henry Ford is generally credited with being the creator of the assembly line. To meet the demand for his Model T automobiles, Mr. Ford knew that just hiring more people wouldn’t be enough to mount the challenge of building Ford Motor Company — it would take technology.
His technology was crude by modern standards, but it did what technology does: leverage the productivity of human beings. During the year Ford’s assembly line was first put in service, he wasn’t just using technology he was creating it. He also turned 50.

The list of technology options today is long and growing and available in features-rich products that support and improve virtually every business task.  How much are you adopting technology to help you leverage the humans in your organization?

Yes, some employees don’t want to embrace technology because they think they’re too old, or have gotten too far behind the curve. Hogwash! There is so much point-and-click technological capability these days that you can ramp up on any learning curve within a matter of days, if not hours. And besides, rapid changes in technology means you can catch up with anyone by being prepared to fully adopt the next generation of capability that’s usually never more than 90 days away.  You can literally go from being technologically illiterate to being an application expert within weeks. But you do have to take that first step.
The great Roman statesman, Cato (234-149 BC) began studying Greek at the age of 80. When asked why he would contemplate such an undertaking at such an advanced age, he replied, “This is the youngest age I have left.”

Regardless of your age or level of technological proficiency, learn how to leverage technology. No excuses! Remember, it’s the youngest age you have left.

Why you should care about the net neutrality debate

As policy battle lines are being drawn in Washington, there’s one important issue being debated that might not stay on your radar like Obamacare and immigration.

It’s called “net neutrality,” and I’m concerned it might not get the attention it deserves, even though it could have significant long-term implications. My goal here is to simplify net neutrality so you understand how it can impact your business and how to join the debate.

The term is pretty intuitive. Net neutrality means all Internet traffic gets treated the same, which is what we’ve had for over 20 years; there’s essentially no government regulation of the Internet and no Internet taxes. Also, there’s no preference for, or discrimination against any sender or receiver of email, web pages, music or movies, regardless of bandwidth used via fixed or mobile networks.

Photo credit to SavetheInternet.com

Photo credit to SavetheInternet.com

Three groups have a stake in net neutrality: carriers, content producers and a regulator.

Carriers fill two roles: 1) Local Internet service providers (ISP) connect you to the Internet; 2) national networks, like AT&T and Sprint, own the “backbone,” the physical infrastructure - fiber - that hauls digital traffic between ISPs. Carriers want to charge different rates based on content quantity and speed, which is contrary to net neutrality. Without targeted revenue for their finite bandwidth inventory, they argue, innovation and investment will stall.

Content producers include Google, NetFlix, Facebook and virtually every small business. If you have a website, sell a product online, conduct email marketing or have an instructional video on YouTube, you’re a content producer. Content producers love net neutrality because turning the Internet into a toll road increases business costs and could make small businesses less competitive.

The regulator is the Federal Communication Commission (FCC), led by Chairman Tom Wheeler. Some content producers have asked the FCC to defend net neutrality. But here’s what that request looks like to a politician: President Obama wants the FCC to reclassify and regulate broadband Internet connection as a utility, which is not the definition of net neutrality.

Net neutrality is complicated because it’s easy to appreciate both business arguments. Plus, some even have a stake in both sides of the issue, like a cable company that owns TV stations and movie studios. But inviting the government to referee this marketplace debate is a Faustian bargain because what government regulates it also taxes, and once started, won’t stop.

Write this on a rock … A regulated and taxed Internet is not net neutrality.

RESULTS: How much do you depend on your smartphone?

The Question:

How much do you depend on your smartphone for tasks other than calling, texting, and email?
24% — Heavy dependence, like social media, newspapers, navigation, travel, etc.
53% — Just a few other tasks right now, but increasingly using it more.
9% — Nothing other than the three in the question.
14% — I don’t own a smartphone.

Jim’s Comments:

There are several reasons why more people - 77% of respondents in our latest poll - are increasingly using smartphones for tasks in their lives.  For example, it now costs no more to manufacture a smartphone than a dumb one, mobile apps increasingly appeal to the

non-technical user, mobile networks encourage them in a number of ways, and perhaps the most important - the cool factor.

I’m pleased to see that small business owners are increasingly owning and using smartphones. When we polled our audience about this not long ago, barely half owned a smartphone. For several years I’ve told you in my articles and on my radio program that if you don’t have and use a smartphone, you can’t keep up with the ever-evolving expectations of your customers.

In my new book, The Age of the Customer, I devote an entire chapter to mobile computing. From Chapter 13, one of the most important points I want you to remember is, “Global computing was not any part of your small business’s past, but it will dominate your future.”

My friend and Brain Trust member, Chuck Martin, has written books about mobile computing and, indeed, has devoted his entire career to the topic.  I encourage you to increase your understanding of the impact of mobile computing with my thoughts and then graduate to Chuck.  Here’s his website where you can find all of Chuck’s information:MobileFutureInstitute.com.  And here’s a link to interviews on mobile computing I’ve had with Chuck on my show.

As a small business owner, using your smartphone for more things delivers two benefits: It will help you become more efficient and productive personally, while providing key insights into what your customers expect from the companies they do business with.

Smartphones and customer expectations

There are several reasons why more people - 77% of respondents in our latest poll - are increasingly using smartphones for tasks in their lives.  For example, it now costs no more to manufacture a smartphone than a dumb one, mobile apps increasingly appeal to the non-technical user, mobile networks encourage them in a number of ways, and perhaps the most important - the cool factor.

I’m pleased to see that small business owners are increasingly owning and using smartphones. When we polled our audience about this not long ago, barely half owned a smartphone. For several years I’ve told you in my articles and on my radio program that if you don’t have and use a smartphone, you can’t keep up with the ever-evolving expectations of your customers.

In my new book, The Age of the Customer, I devote an entire chapter to mobile computing. From Chapter 13, one of the most important points I want you to remember is, “Global computing was not any part of your small business’s past, but it will dominate your future.”

My friend and Brain Trust member, Chuck Martin, has written books about mobile computing and, indeed, has devoted his entire career to the topic.  I encourage you to increase your understanding of the impact of mobile computing with my thoughts and then graduate to Chuck.  Here’s his website where you can find all of Chuck’s information:MobileFutureInstitute.com.  And here’s a link to interviews on mobile computing I’ve had with Chuck on my show.

As a small business owner, using your smartphone for more things delivers two benefits: It will help you become more efficient and productive personally, while providing key insights into what your customers expect from the companies they do business with.

RESULTS: Do you read business books, either ebooks or physical?

The Question:

Do you read business books, either ebooks or physical?
52% — I still buy and read business books.
14% — I no longer buy or read business books.
16% — I will buy and read a book if it’s recommended by a friend.
18% — I will read a business book if it’s a gift.

Jim’s Comments:

Whether purchased or not, 86% of our respondents read business books.  As an author of business books, these results make me very happy, even if 16% only buy a business book if it’s recommended and 18% wait until someone gives them a copy.

These days, with so much information available online, it’s not unreasonable to believe you can get what you need for free from a website or blog instead of paying for a book. In fact, on both of my two websites you can read a lot of what is in my new book for free. But articles and blog posts don’t accomplish the complete experience and impact an author delivers between the two covers of a book.

One of my mentors once told me, “The person you’ll be in five years will be greatly influenced by the people you meet and the books you read.”




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