suivant continue page aller aller levaquin tablets dosage http://www.westkern-oilmuseum....or-valtrex cialis cout cialis günstig cialis kopen zonder recept site klicken Siguiente netz tienda comprarcialis geberico

Archive for the 'Economy: National and Global' Category

POLL RESULTS: To what do you attribute the reason the U.S. economy is still slow?

The Question: To what do you attribute the reason the U.S. economy is still slow?

2% - The slowdown in the global economy - especially China.

77% - Washington’s anti-business policies, especially from Obama.

16% - Lack of investment in the economy by corporate America.

5% - What slow economy? We’re doing great.

Jim’s Comments:
In our poll this week, only 5% of America’s small businesses report their businesses are doing great, while more than three-fourths say they think their business is being held back by Washington’s anti-business policies. If this were any other significant voting bloc, these numbers would be foretelling a revolution.

And make no mistake. When you add up all small business owners in America, plus their employees and voting age dependent children, that number would total about 100 million voters. Find another constituency like that!

With this sentiment in evidence, if small business owners and their connected “family” got organized behind what’s good for the entity that feeds and clothes them, they could be the electoral revolution. And the result would be what’s good for small business. Which I’ve long held and have many times said that what’s good for small business is good for the world.

Alas, we’re not organized. If we were, the world would change - for the better.

Thanks for playing along. Please participate in this week’s poll below.

Washington’s New Hashtag: #WithoutAnySenseOfShame

Let me tell you a story.

A boss gives an employee a project on January 1st that could easily be completed right away. This project had significant financial implications for the company. Month after month the boss checks in with the employee but finds the project still isn’t completed. The employee hasn’t done his job.

Finally, in the middle of December, almost a year later, the employee delivers the finished project as if there’s been a great accomplishment, but with two pieces of bad news: There are only two weeks left for the project to contribute to this year’s business, plus the project just delivered will be useless on January 1 without being completely reworked.

No doubt right now you’re yelling, “Who keeps an employee like this?” Or perhaps you’re saying, “This is a joke, right? No organization operates like that.” Sadly, this scenario is not only true, it’s been happening in a real organization, like in the movie Groundhog Day, for several years.

The employee in my story is Congress and the employer is America’s small business owners. The projects are 52 tax extenders which Congress has chosen to reapprove annually rather than make them permanent.

Many of these extenders are key factors in growth strategies, plus cash and tax planning for millions of businesses. Perhaps the most prominent is section 179 of the tax code. Part of this section allows and sets a limit for direct expensing of capital items in the year of acquisition, rather than depreciating those items over years.

For several years the Section 179 expensing limit, and the amount awaiting re-approval, was $500,000. But if this provision isn’t renewed it drops to $25,000. And just like in my story, instead of finishing the project permanently, Congress keeps renewing this extender each year, which wouldn’t be so bad if they did their work in January. But in 2014, without any sense of shame, Congress passed another one-year extension for the $500,000 level on December 16.

The expensing provision might not change whether you make the investment, nor the price of the purchase, but it does impact cash flow and tax planning for the year of acquisition, which is a big deal for most small businesses. If you were trying to make a 2014 equipment purchase decision, you had less than two weeks – over the holidays – to get that equipment in service in order to take advantage of the expensing option.

When you’ve read my past criticism of the anti-business practices of the political class in Washington, this is but one example. Like it or not, the tax code is very much a part of business investment decisions for companies large and small. And when investment decisions impeded at the micro level of a single purchase are aggregated across millions of businesses, it has a negative impact on economic growth. It’s not difficult to see how Congress’s failure to do their job has contributed to the moribund 2% annual GDP growth we’ve been suffering since 2009.

So here we are again feeling like it’s Groundhog Day because, like last year, Congress still hasn’t renewed the tax extenders for 2015. Next time someone asks why non-politicians are polling so high in the presidential campaigns, tell them this story.

Write this on a rock … Washington’s new Twitter hashtag should be: #WITHOUTANYSENSEOFSHAME.

Jim Blasingame is author of the award-winning book, The Age of the Customer: Prepare for the Moment of Relevance.

It’s Time to Tell The Truth About Minimum Wage

Before any product or service is offered to customers, the price must be determined. The foundational element of this calculus are costs, which includes labor. In a true free-market economy, all elements of cost are determined by the marketplace. But in the U.S., we don’t have a true free-market economy because of mandates and subsidies imposed by the federal government, one of which is the minimum wage.

Alas, raising the minimum wage is being proposed again.

When the government is involved, politics, not reason, is the motivation, which isn’t so bad when the issue is politics. But politics has no place in what businesses pay for their cost factors, especially labor, often the largest cost factor.

When proposed, the national minimum wage was never some great egalitarian blow for the working man. It became law in 1938 as a cynical, protectionist move by the Congressional delegations of the northern textile industry – primarily Massachusetts –against their southern counterparts, whose lower, market-based labor costs made them more competitive.

Today the minimum wage has become a political wedge issue of the cruelest type, because research shows each increase actually hurts the segment it purports to help, especially younger, entry-level workers, like teenagers and minorities. The primary reason is that for decades employers have controlled the impact of an increase by reducing entry-level positions using various organizational steps. But today, technological advances have given all employers an increased ability to forgo entry-level hires in favor of low-maintenance, non-taxed innovative devices and/or software.

The results of two recent online polls reveal how these options manifest on Main Street. When we asked about their attitude toward the minimum wage, 82% of small businesses said the government should not be setting wage rates. But when asked how a minimum wage increase would impact their business, 76% said “Not at all.” The reason for the lack of concern by the sector that doesn’t like the minimum wage is likely because: a) they’re already paying more than minimum wage; b) they have legal ways around it to the disadvantage of the unskilled, increasingly unemployed worker.

An important goal of most businesses is growth, but adding payroll expense to achieve it is no longer a given. And so far, business owners are in charge of the decision to add workers or use other means to achieve growth. Nevertheless, increasing minimum wage does cause problems: an arbitrary increase distorts all wages as it becomes the new base from which other workers measure wage progress. If a small business adjusts all wages up in response, expenses rise. But if it doesn’t, morale declines. Furthermore, unions use minimum wage as a contract lever to exact from employers automatic, across the board increases for all organized workers.

In the marketplace, any increase in price must be justified by value delivered. But this logic is lost when labor costs rise by government fiat without adding one extra unit of productivity.

Write this on a rock … Let’s call the minimum wage what it is: A political lie that actually hurts poor and unskilled workers.

Jim Blasingame is author of the award-winning book, The Age of the Customer: Prepare for the Moment of Relevance.

RESULTS: What is the greatest challenge to your business success?

The Question:

Which of these is the greatest challenge to your business’ success over the next 3-5 years?

23% - National and/or local economy
43% - National/state/local politics/policies, like taxes, regs, dysfunction
21% - Organizational deficiencies, like capital, talent, size, technology
5% - Big competitors and globalization
8%-  Internet competition

Jim’s Comments:

As you can see, when it comes to future challenges, only one-fifth of small business owners think their own internal issues might be holding them back. All the rest believe their greatest challenges lie outside their four walls

Two concerns representing two-thirds of our respondents, the economy and the government, are outside of the control of a small business, with the exception of their political involvement and their marketplace efforts. But the other three, including internal issues, are within the realm of a small business owner’s influence.

  • You can improve their own capital, systems and people;
  • You can realize the Big Boxes are more of a problem between your ears than on Main Street; and
  • You can accept the fact that the Internet isn’t going away and add that component to your traditional strategies.

I’m going to have more to say about this in an upcoming Feature Article. So stay tuned.

RESULTS: What do the signs read for your business in 2015?

The Question: Looking into 2015, what do the signs look like for your business?

28% - All signs point toward 2015 being a great growth year for us.
55% - We’re cautiously optimistic 2015 will be better than last year.
15% - We’re expecting no more business than last year.
2% - Right now, 2015 looks like a tough year for us.
Jim’s Comments:
As you may know, we’ve been polling small business owners about many topics for several years. At least four times a year we ask about the economy, either how it has been or what it’s looking like. Since the end of the Great Recession in July 2009, it’s been interesting that our responses have consistently shown about a fourth to a third doing well, about half doing just okay, and the rest doing poorly.

Many sources are reporting how the economy seems to be finally gaining some momentum. We wanted to know what you thought about these reports, so last week we asked how the New Year was looking. As you can see, the ratio of responses hasn’t changed much from past polls. This tells me after six years of a moribund economy most small business owners aren’t going to get excited until they can confirm that economic momentum has reached all the way down to the last mile of Main Street.

RESULTS:Have the midterms impacted your attitude about the 2015 economy?

The Question:

Photo credit to DonkeyHotey on Flickr.comHow have the results of the midterm election impacted your attitude about the economy in 2015?

18% - I’m optimistic about next year but not because of politics
44% - I’m more optimistic about 2015 because the GOP control Congress
0% - I’m less optimistic because the Democrats lost control of Congress
38% - I’m pessimistic about the economy because of all the politicians
Jim’s Comments:
As you can see, over half of our respondents are either indifferent toward, or negative about the impact of the Political Class on their business.  The rest are hopeful about their business because of the upcoming Republican-controlled Congress. Alas, the Dems got no love in this poll.
I’m going to have more to say about these results in a longer piece in the next week or so. Stay tuned. Thanks for participating and be sure to take our new poll this week.

**Photo credit to Donkey Hotey on Image links to page. (CC).

Warning: fsockopen() [function.fsockopen]: php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Temporary failure in name resolution in /var/www/wordpress/wp-includes/class-snoopy.php on line 1142

Warning: fsockopen() [function.fsockopen]: unable to connect to (Unknown error) in /var/www/wordpress/wp-includes/class-snoopy.php on line 1142