Monthly Archive for May, 2015

Poll Results: Is the mainstream media biased and if so, does it impact how they report the news?

The Question:

Is the mainstream media biased and if so, does it impact how they report the news?

8% - The media are not biased and reporting is fair across the industry.


83% - The media are biased toward Democrats enough to influence their reporting.

6% - The media are biased toward Republicans enough to influence their reporting.
3% - The media seems to have a Democrat bias, but it does not impact reporting.

Jim’s Comments:

For many years, surveys of members of the media have revealed that the vast majority consider themselves liberals and, therefore, likely Democrats. Over the past thirty or forty years, these statistics, as our own polling seemed to indicate, have increasingly manifested as biased reporting.

And you don’t have to take my — or 83% of my audience’s — word for it. There have been a number of cases of high level bias so flagrant that sometimes jobs were lost and careers ended once exposed. In other cased jobs should have been lost but weren’t, like when CNN’s Candy Crowley became part of Team Obama in the 2012 debate she moderated against Romney.

More recently, the bias has been evident in the media’s failure to report on certain issues because it would have been negative toward one of their ideological causes or individuals. Like very little reporting on four dead Americans in Benghazi, while during the same period doing hundreds of reports on Gov. Christie’s Bridge-gate incident, which inconvenienced commuters.

More than a few observers have gone so far as to call the mainstream media corrupt. If this is true, and I wish I could argue with these people, America is the weaker for it. When you consider the state controlled media in Russia, Iran, China, and North Korea, it’s easy to see that an impartial media is essential to liberty and democracy.

Freedom Isn’t Free

Contemplating the blessing of freedom, wherever it may be found, one prime truth is evident: Freedom is not free. And for those of us who are the beneficiaries of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom, the only method of repayment - the only way we can ever be worthy of their sacrifice - is if we do all we can to maintain the freedom that has been paid for and given to us.

In honor of all of our veterans, past and present, I’d like to offer this poem written by Commander Kelly Strong, USCG (Ret.) in 1981 when he was a high school senior (JROTC cadet) at Homestead High School, Homestead, FL. It is a tribute to his father, a career marine who served two tours in Vietnam.

Freedom Isn’t Free

I watched the flag pass by one day.

It fluttered in the breeze.

A young Marine saluted it,

And then he stood at ease.

I looked at him in uniform

So young, so tall, so proud,

With hair cut square and eyes alert

He’d stand out in any crowd.

I thought how many men like him

Had fallen through the years.

How many died on foreign soil?

How many mothers’ tears?

How many pilots’ planes shot down?

How many died at sea?

How many foxholes were soldiers’ graves?

No, freedom isn’t free.

I heard the sound of taps one night,

When everything was still

I listened to the bugler play

And felt a sudden chill.

I wondered just how many times

That taps had meant “Amen,”

When a flag had draped a coffin

Of a brother or a friend.

I thought of all the children,

Of the mothers and the wives,

Of fathers, sons and husbands

With interrupted lives.

I thought about a graveyard

At the bottom of the sea

Of unmarked graves in Arlington.

No, freedom isn’t free.

My friends, I pray that we never forget those who paid so dearly for our freedom.  I hope you had a safe, happy and respectful Memorial Day.

Remember America’s Militia on Memorial Day

This is Jim’s traditional Memorial Day column.

Reasonable people disagree on the origins of Memorial Day, but most accept that the practice of decorating the graves of Americans who died in military service began in earnest during the Civil War.

On May 5, 1868, General John A. Logan, Commander of the Army of the Republic, made Memorial Day official with General Order No. 11, which stated in part, “… the 30th day of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country …” And other than Congress making Memorial Day a national holiday on the last Monday in May, America has since honored its fallen heroes from all conflicts pretty much as General Logan ordered.

When America issued its first call to arms before we had a professional army, it went to the militia, which was identified as “all able-bodied men.”  Called “Minutemen” because they could be ready to fight on a minute’s notice, they were primarily shopkeepers, craftsmen, farmers, etc. Today we call them small business owners.

From as far away as Scotland, America’s Minutemen were impressive. Writing about the colonies’ quest for independence in “The Wealth of Nations,” Adam Smith predicted America would prevail thanks to its militia which, “…turns from its primary citizen character into a standing army.”

Early in the 20th century, state militias became the National Guard and the National Defense Act created the Reserves. In every war or conflict since, America has deployed these latter-day Minutemen (and women) alongside regular forces, where they represented a proportional number of casualties.

On this Memorial Day, as we honor all who paid the ultimate price in service to this country, let’s also remember the long tradition of America’s militia, including small business owners and employees, who served courageously on behalf of a grateful nation. It’s hard enough leaving family to march into harm’s way, but the degree of difficulty of that commitment is compounded for volunteers who also disconnect from businesses and full-time careers.

Contemplating the blessing of freedom wherever it may be found, there is one prime truth: Freedom is not free. As beneficiaries of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom, our only method of repayment—the only way we can ever be worthy of their sacrifice—is to do all we can to maintain the freedom that they paid for and gave to us.

Write this on a rock –

God bless those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom, including past and present Minutemen.

Jim Blasingame is the author of the new book, “The Age of the Customer: Prepare for the Moment of Relevance.”

Entrepreneurial Telekenesis

Have you ever seen someone who moved objects with their mind, or bent a spoon by merely concentrating on it?  Telekinesis, as defined by Webster, is the power to move an object by psychic force alone. Mind over matter.

The idea of telekinesis has fascinated humans for millennia, including this human. Like me, you probably have a healthy level of skepticism about such claims. But what would you say if I said you are capable of telekinesis?

If you have ever done any physical training, you know that your body constantly sends messages to your brain that it’s ready to shut down. When that first dissenting word from your leg muscles hit your brain did you obey, or did you send back a message that those muscles would just have to tough it out? Sometimes one side of your brain, the side focused on your goal, has to have a word with the other side, the one that is a close friend with comfort.

At some time in our lives, most of us ran, jumped, cycled, lifted, swam, etc., at performance levels beyond which seemed possible to us in the early stages of training.We learned that building strength and endurance requires our body’s comfort to become subordinate to attaining a goal we had set. What is that if not mind over matter?

As small business owners, we perform a kind of entrepreneurial telekinesis every day. We accomplish things that marketplace pedestrians would say are impossible. And if you think I’m using the term telekinesis too loosely, what else would you call it when a small business owner defies the marketplace, the competition, and conventional thought by not only surviving, but actually thriving? Your entrepreneurial mind has the potential to defy the odds, the gravity of the marketplace, and matter, as we know it.

Will is an intangible force created by another intangible, desire. As you desire to move your business forward, whenever the matter is weak, you compensate with will. Mind over matter.

But don’t try this on spoons.

Thanks for being part of my community. I’ll see you on the radio and the Internet.

RESULTS: With Mother’s Day coming up, how much did your mother influence your life?

The Question:

With Mother’s Day coming up, how much did your mother influence your life?

24% - My mother was the most influential parent in my life.
54% - My mother was very influential in my life.

16% - My mother was only somewhat influential in my life.
5% - My mother was not a factor in my life.

Jim’s Comments:

It was good to see that almost eight-of-ten of our sample were significantly influenced by their mothers.

I used that word - influence - on purpose in this week’s question about our mothers. I’ve never doubted my mother’s abundant love, which obviously influenced my life. But some of the ways she influenced me was how she showed up, her work ethic, and specific times when love wasn’t exactly in my definition of how she was “influencing” me, if you know what I mean, and I think you do.

Happy Mothers Day to those who gave us life, and loved us even when we weren’t loveable. And happy Mothers Day to those who aren’t our biological mothers, but chose to love and care about us anyway. In addition to my mother, Virginia, who just turned 91, this week I’m also thinking about three aunts who were nothing less than my guardian angels - Kathleen, Reba and Addie - who now are real angels.

The Blasingame Translator for Small Businesses and Banks

Once upon a time, a storm caused two ships to sink in the same area. All on board were lost at sea, save one from each ship, and those poor souls were alive only because they swam to a small island nearby.

As luck would have it, the two men hauled themselves up on the beach at the same time and within sight of each other. But survivor’s elation soon became pensive as they realized that each spoke a language unknown to the other

Immediately both men had the same unspoken thought, “I don’t know this man or the language he speaks, but if we’re going to survive, we have to find a way to communicate and work together.”

In many ways, this tale actually plays out every day. But instead of on the high seas, our story takes place in the marketplace. And instead of mythical shipwreck survivors, our real life players are small business owners and bankers.

Like the survivors in the first story, the excitement of the latter-day castaways about their future prospects turns pensive when they both realize that: 1) they need each other in order to be successful; and 2) they don’t speak each other’s language very well, if at all.

With so much common interest and so little mutual understanding, can these two create a successful survival story? Absolutely, but only if they have the Blasingame Official Translator for Bankers & Small Business Owners. Here are a few examples of how the Blasingame Translator works.

For small businesses to understand banker, they must:
1. Identify their banker as a success partner and their business’ best friend.
2. Stay close to their banker when things are going well, and even closer when things aren’t going so well. 3. Believe that an uninformed banker is a scared banker, and a scared banker cannot, and will not, behave like a partner.
4. Pay attention to what motivates and impresses a banker, like attention to detail.
5. Understand pertinent bank rules and regulations, so you don’t ask for something that can’t be done. 6. Reward banker loyalty with small business loyalty.

For bankers to speak small business, they must:
1. Understand Blasingame’s 1st Law of Small Business: Starting a small business is easy, operating a successful one is not.
2. Understand Blasingame’s 2nd Law of Small Business: It’s redundant to say, “undercapitalized small business.”
3. Understand Blasingame’s 3rd Law of Small Business: A small business is not a little big business.
4. Explain bank rules and regulations, and recommend services and products.
5. In the credit scoring process, always find a way to give small business owners credit for character, past performance and best efforts.
6. Reward small business loyalty with banker loyalty.

Write this on a rock … To avoid becoming marketplace castaways, small business owners and bankers must speak each other’s language.




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